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Vetter Stories

Our customers attach great importance to partners that think and act similarly to them on core issues. And, we expect the same from our suppliers.

Peter Soelkner, Managing Director

Economic success and social responsibility can be combined successfully

As a globally operating family-owned company, Vetter highly values sustainable development. Its corporate responsibility goes far beyond legal requirements.

What does the term corporate social responsibility mean to Vetter?


Being firmly rooted in our region for decades, we are actually a globally operating company. That means we need to think and act globally in order to be aligned with our partners and the markets we serve. Vetter shares a common goal with its customers, and that is improving the quality of life for patients that rely on the drugs we manufacture for them. This is a task with immense responsibility that we approach with great commitment on a daily basis. At Vetter, we understand this responsibility in holistic terms in relation to both our activities and our target groups. Conducting ourselves with responsibility is firmly anchored in our corporate philosophy, ranging from our actions towards our customers as well as those regarding our staff members and suppliers. Even more so, as a company it is our intention to do good for our society.
 

How is this approach linked to your customers and suppliers?


As a service provider for large and small pharmaceutical and biotech companies alike, we generally see ourselves as a partner at eye level which requires similar views and ideas. Our customers attach great importance to partners that think and act similarly to them on core issues. And, we expect the same from our suppliers. In addition to personal contact, this approach occurs within the scope of regular audits. These audits are important for all parties to assess the current situation and offer opportunities for continuous further development.

How is corporate social responsibility implemented and incorporated in concrete terms?

At Vetter, we attach great importance to transparency. That is why we created our self-image through a corporate social responsibility program which is based on the five pillars: compliance, sustainability, health and family, education, and social commitment, with concrete actions and goals backing them.
 
I would like to name just a few exemplary components to give a better idea of our commitment. One is our binding code of conduct which we implemented as the basis for our daily activities. A sustainable energy supply is also important to us. Thus, we have recently started operating all of our German sites with green electricity. In addition, we are a proud signatory to the Germany-wide initiative Diversity Charter, in which we commit ourselves to the values of acceptance, tolerance and trust. 
When it comes to health and family, we support our staff members in many ways through our occupational health management Vetter Health, and also through numerous offers for better compatibility of family and career. And, we are committed to social and educational initiatives such as science-based programs in a number of kindergartens as well as nationwide campaigns such as Girls' Day, where young women are encouraged to explore professions that have been typically dominated by men. Finally, we are also engaged in initiatives for refugees. I believe these few examples demonstrate the multidimensional and holistic nature of our approach.